Extracting Sperm in a Lab Made Easier

For a man who has low sperm count and therefore not enough sperm in his ejaculate, it can be almost impossible to conceive naturally. Luckily, this issue is one that is becoming increasingly easy to overcome.

 

Previously, if this was the issue a man struggled with, his doctor would try to extract sperm from his testicles directly. This proved difficult: the man doesn’t have a high number of sperm to begin with, sperm doesn’t spread evenly throughout the testes, and doctors had no way of knowing what matter they were gathering. Even when they did finally get a sample, doctors found that it was a viable sample for in vitro fertilization (IVF) only half the time.

 

A University of Munich research team is hoping that their research will change this. They reckon that a “probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy could do the trick. The technique is a relation to conventional optical confocal microscopy, which uses two light detectors rather than one to sharpen images and even render them in 3D.” The laser would allow doctors to see within areas they’ve never been able to, “tagging” sperm to make them more identifiable and easier to gather and extract.

 

If this procedure does become widely-used by doctors, it would make assisted reproductive procedures such as IVF and intrauterine insemination (IUI) much easier to accomplish. The important thing is that if you believe you are having an overly difficult time conceiving, you see a doctor as soon as possible. With help, you could achieve your dream of having a child.

For a man who has low sperm count and therefore not enough sperm in his ejaculate, it can be almost impossible to conceive naturally. Luckily, this issue is one that is becoming increasingly easy to overcome.
Previously, if this was the issue a man struggled with, his doctor would try to extract sperm from his testicles directly. This proved difficult: the man doesn’t have a high number of sperm to begin with, sperm doesn’t spread evenly throughout the testes, and doctors had no way of knowing what matter they were gathering. Even when they did finally get a sample, doctors found that it was a viable sample for in vitro fertilization (IVF) only half the time.
A University of Munich research team is hoping that their research will change this. They reckon that a “probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy could do the trick. The technique is a relation to conventional optical confocal microscopy, which uses two light detectors rather than one to sharpen images and even render them in 3D.” The laser would allow doctors to see within areas they’ve never been able to, “tagging” sperm to make them more identifiable and easier to gather and extract.
If this procedure does become widely-used by doctors, it would make assisted reproductive procedures such as IVF and intrauterine insemination (IUI) much easier to accomplish. The important thing is that if you believe you are having an overly difficult time conceiving, you see a doctor as soon as possible. With help, you could achieve your dream of having a child.
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